Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Tasting: Talisker Storm

Talisker’s Storm was added to their core range back in 2013 – the same year Talisker released their double matured Port Ruighe. Together with Sky, Dark Storm, 57° North and Neist Point, Storm and Point Ruighe represent Talisker’s NAS Core range.

Talisker states that the Storm “has been accentuated through a skilful blend of different aged Talisker casks”, which leaves a lot of questions unanswered, maybe most importantly; who’s the twat writing these descriptions, because aren’t each and every official bottling’ from Talisker made from blending different aged casks together?
It would, for example, have been quite nice for a change, being granted the information of cask type instead of the usual mumble jumble.

Storm is bottled at Talisker’s standard 45,8% ABV and the colour has been adjusted with caramel colouring, which always bums me out. I might have said it before, so stop me if you heard this one before, but not because I believe I can taste a difference when E155a caramel colouring has been added, but simply because I don’t like anyone to fiddle with my whisky like that.

Talisker’s Storm is retailed at $71USD here in Denmark, but can usually be found at various supermarkets for around $47USD.


Talisker. Storm
Single Malt Scotch Whisky

Distillery: Talisker
Region: Island (Isle of Skye)
Age: NAS
Proof/ABV: 45,8%
DK Price: $71USD/450dkk
Release: Ongoing

Points: 84/100







Nose:
Right off the bat, Talisker’s familiar red chilli pepper note, followed by a very clean cut smokiness and bitter orange marmalade with a tad of salty sea air.
  
Palate:
Quite oily and creamy with a fruity taste of muskmelon and vanilla ice cream, with burned ash, black pepper and cinnamon.

Finish:
Briny long finish on a fruit juicy trip.

Overall impression:
It’s a more tamed, accessible and not quite as complex as my beloved 10, but it’s defiantly one of the more enjoyable Talisker’s out there, and it kicks the rather failed barrel finished Port Ruighe’ ass, that I review a while back.

Photo & Review By: Hasse Berg